COVID_19 support

Transforming cancer research

Our global oncology site network provides opportunities for patients and oncologists to advance the development of cancer treatments

How we are transforming cancer research

How we are transforming cancer research

By accessing cutting edge cancer treatments with Oncologists who are advancing scientific knowledge you can learn more about your own medical condition and help others across the world if the therapy is approved. Higher rates of clinical trial participation, using our integrated global research model – can produce better patient outcomes, reduce the cost of care and advance research for all patients.

Patient care options

Patient care options

Patient care is at the heart of everything we do, and we are committed to ensuring you are treated with the utmost care and respect whilst maintaining our high standard of research activity. Each potential treatment is provided in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere to help shape the future of world health for you and future generations.

Learn more
Clinical trial participation

Clinical trial participation

When you participate in a clinical trial, you will be welcomed by our professional and caring staff who will guide you through the process and help you feel comfortable and appreciated as a research trial participant.

Find a study

Find a study

We have many cancer trials currently ongoing through our collaboration with Pharmaceutical companies. We are actively recruiting patients into these trials and would love to hear from you if you wish to participate in to advancing cancer treatments.

Learn more
Pandemic respiratory vaccine clinical trials

Partner with Oncacare to transform cancer research

Oncacare has a well developed value proposition for Sites to participate with clear demonstration of benefits to the site. Their operating models are attracting many oncologists to join Oncacare in advancing cancer research. Oncacare has central offices at 10 Bloomsbury Way, London and has outstanding global experience and expertise in the delivery of quality clinical research.

Pandemic respiratory vaccine clinical trials

New Trends in Treating Sarcoma

MSK, a private cancer centre, are seeking to identify effective immunotherapy based treatments (treatment of a disease by activating or suppressing the immune system) for sarcoma) FDA approval of checkpoint inhibitors (drugs that block specific proteins on the surface of immune T cells which releases a natural brake on the immune system, allowing it to attack the cancer) have greatly improved therapeutic options for sarcoma. Sarcoma’s are rare cancers that grow in the body’s connective tissue including fat, blood vessels, nerves, bones, muscles and cartilage. Sarcoma has more than 50 distinct subtypes and the threat of metastasis can be high. Whilst sarcoma patients respond well to treatment the duration of the benefit can be short and side effects can be tough. Each type of sarcoma behaves differently and requires distinct treatment approaches. Hence a single therapy may not work for all types of sarcomas. As immunotherapy empowers the immune system to fight different types of cancer, MSK are exploring immunotherapy strategies based on the underlying principle it is better to treat the patient and let their own body treat the cancer. MSK are investigating use of checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell therapy (a therapy that involves removing T cells from patients and modifying the cells in a way that enables them to recognize and attack specific molecules on the surface of cancer cells) Immunotherapy strategies One strategy with regards to checkpoint inhibitors is to seek the best combination therapy for specific metastatic sarcoma subtypes. This strategy includes identifying sarcoma biomarkers (a naturally occurring molecule, gene or characteristic by which a particular disease can be identified) to predict response to specific immunotherapies. Other strategies are to combine checkpoint inhibitors with new drugs that boost immune response for metastatic or locally advanced sarcoma. to combine checkpoint inhibitors with a drug that blocks the enzyme produced by tumor cells (which allows the tumor to avoid the immune system) thereby helping the immune system attack the tumor with full force. to combine checkpoint inhibitors with attenuated (weakened) herpes virus – this is a recent trial where results are currently being analysed. Strategies with adoptive T-cell therapy Pilot study which is based on engineering T-cells extracted from patients with synovial sarcoma to recognise a unique protein contained in that sarcoma cell types to target those cancer cells selectively. Trials are also being conducted for myxoid liposarcoma . Using Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR ) T cell therapy which has had promising results for those with chemotherapy-resistant leukaemia. New research is focussing on developing CAR T Cells to target proteins typically found on sarcoma cells with aim of launching trials in this area. Major hurdle is to predict effectiveness of a therapy for a particular sarcoma. Identification of sarcoma biomarkers to help with these predictions is being conducted. New treatments have been approved by the FDA for treating gastrointestinal stromal (GIST) tumour and epithelioid sarcoma (ES). The approval of these new drugs by FDA has increased the potential for new treatments for sarcoma. There is a great potential for immunotherapy based treatments for sarcoma. If you are interested in trials for new treatments in sarcoma please look at our website for clinical trials in sarcoma or contact us.

New drug cuts the risk of death in Bladder Cancer by 30%, study suggests

New drug cuts the risk of death in Bladder Cancer by 30%, study suggests

New drug cuts the risk of death in bladder cancer by 30% compared with chemotherapy, study suggests If you are interested in trials for new treatments in bladder cancer  please look at our website for clinical trials in sarcoma or contact us. Globally, urothelial cancer accounts for around 549,000 new cases of bladder cancer and 200,000 deaths each year, and is generally treated with chemotherapy. A trial comparing new antibody-drug conjugate enfortumab vedotin with chemotherapy has been conducted. Antibody-drug conjugates are targeted medicines that deliver chemotherapy agents directly to the cancer cells and doesn’t damage healthy cells Compared to chemotherapy treatments, the trial results show that with this new drug Overall survival was longer (13 months v 9 months) Progression-free survival was also longer ( 5.6 months compared to 3.7 months ) Percentage of patients with either complete or partial response was 40.6% in patients using the new drug compared with 17.9% in the chemotherapy setting. Side effects were found to be manageable and similar to chemotherapyy According to the lead UK researcher for this study, this new drug has “reduced the death rate by 30% and beat chemotherapy in every setting, so this really is a big deal.” A lead pharmacists also hailed the results of this study as “potentially practice changing” for treating advanced urothelial cancer patients. The lead pharmacist additionally stated that  “For decades, few treatment options were available to treat this disease for which the prognosis remains poor. However, after introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors a few years ago, it is encouraging to see that further progress has been made with enfortumab vedotin in this disease setting” Further clinical experience in the clinical setting will be required to assess the real-world survival benefit of enfortumab vedotin. The drug is already available in the United States after FDA  gave it accelerated approval, and is currently awaiting regulatory approval in the UK. Researchers say it could be available to NHS patients in a few months if it goes through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme. If you are interested in trials for new treatments in bladder cancer  please look at our website for clinical trials in sarcoma or contact us.